LEDs set to get cheaper, efficient

The newly developed material, which dissolve easily and can be applied like paint to light bulbs, shines a blue, green or red light.

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One of the biggest hurdles in adoption of LED lighting is the cost involved and the inability of energy savings to offset these high costs. This is about to change as a new research has shown promise of a efficient yet cheaper LED technology.

The new LED technology, which is said to have the potential of revolutionising lighting technology, has been developed by Zhibin Yu, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Florida State University.

The new technology involves a combination of organic and inorganic materials. The newly developed material, which dissolve easily and can be applied like paint to light bulbs, shines a blue, green or red light. This is not its selling point though as what makes this technology special is the fact that it only requires one laying unlike traditional LED lights which require four or five layers of material on top of each other to create a product with desired effects.

Production with multiple layering not only is cumbersome, but also increases the overall cost making currently available LED lights costly thereby restricting widespread adoption.

The research has been awarded by the National Science Foundation encouraging further investigation of the essential materials required for the technology and to establish the processing platform for the development of intrinsically stretchable, active-matrix organic LED displays.

The discovery has been published in the journal Advanced Materials.